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POSTCARDS: EASTER 1916 SET 2

Mount Street Bridge

Over half of the deaths and injuries of the Easter Uprising happened at this innocent-looking site. British reinforcements had arrived from England via Kingstown Harbour on Wednesday morning. Proceeding in good spirits towards the city centre from Northumberland Road, they met with devasting Rebel sniper fire as they attempted to cross the bridge. The British thought they were facing several hundred Rebels; in fact it was only 17 men in strategic locations. Although other options were available to them, the British officer in charge, Colonel Fane, gave orders for a direct charge. Not until 7 o'clock in the evening did they make it through and by that time 230 British soldiers were dead or wounded.


Sackville Street in Flames. A photograph taken by a "Daily Sketch" Photographer under fire.

Another incorrectly dated card; the Rising was in April rather than May. The civilian population was horrified at the blazing fires and destruction and held the Rebels responsible for the devastation of central Dublin. Public opinion turned from disgust to sympathy, however, as the British slowly executed the leaders one by one at Kilmainham Jail.


The Sinn Fein Revolt in Dublin
Interior of the ruined main sorting room in the post office

The General Post Office (GPO) on Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street) in Dublin was the scene of much of the drama of the Easter Rebellion. The Easter Proclamation was read from its steps, and leaders Patrick Pearse, Tom Clarke and James Connolly managed affairs from inside the large building until widespread fire forced their retreat and ultimate surrender.


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